"When I’m reading, I’m looking for something to steal. Readers ask me all the time the traditional question ‘Where do you get your ideas from?” I reply: ‘We are all having ideas all the time. But I’m on the lookout for them. You’re not.’"

Philip Pullman on stealing like an artist (via austinkleon)

(via austinkleon)

calmingmanatee:

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: A photograph of two manatees swimming the ocean. The mother is in the top left of the frame, looking at the camera, and her calf is swimming alongside her. In the background is the sea bottom. TEXT: “Please don’t be angry because you aren’t perfect at something. Change takes time. You are smart and capable. You can do anything. We believe in you.”]
[Photo credit]

calmingmanatee:

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: A photograph of two manatees swimming the ocean. The mother is in the top left of the frame, looking at the camera, and her calf is swimming alongside her. In the background is the sea bottom. TEXT: “Please don’t be angry because you aren’t perfect at something. Change takes time. You are smart and capable. You can do anything. We believe in you.”]

[Photo credit]

veg-r3 Asked:
Thank you for posting some advice to writers. I'm doing a group presentation for a "writers on writing" assignment in a composition theory course and although I know that no two novels are written using the precisely same method, I was wondering overall what processes work for you, whether it be in first drafts or your editing process. :)

neil-gaiman:

Normally my methods are something along the lines of:

Start at the beginning. Or at least, start somewhere: it may turn out to have been the beginning.

Keep going somehow until the end.

Make it look like I knew what I was doing all the time. 

Hi Neil, I'm a huge fan of your work. I was wondering if you could give me some writing advice. I'm stuck about 2/3 of the way through a first draft, and I've got plot threads running all over the place. Do you have any suggestions on what I can do to bring them all back to my central plot? Thanks in advance! -April

neil-gaiman:

Make a list of what has to happen to get you to the end of the story. Write down all the dangling plot threads and ways you can resolve each one. Look for ways that you can deal with several plot threads at the same time.

I tend to be less concerned with how things happen than with what has to happen to people, so I list my plot threads by people. I write down things like “Fat Charlie has to SING.”

And then start writing again. Good luck.

mattfractionblog:

nighttime me is  a straight-up dick

mattfractionblog:

nighttime me is  a straight-up dick

"Nobody told us that girls, much less Mexican girls, weren’t supposed to like science fiction. Undeniably, few if any of the characters in the mainstream science fiction films and television programs of the 1970s and early 1980s looked like us. As the African American science fiction writer Octavia E. Butler pointed out, Star Wars featured “every kind of alien … but only one kind of human—white ones” (Beal 1986, 17). Sadly, only Ricardo Montalbán’s Khan and Blade Runner’s Gaff, played by our homie Edward James Olmos, resembled us. Moreover, there was no mistaking me for any of the good guys—in the strictest sense of “guy.” Yet, despite the genre’s androcentrism and overwhelming whiteness, I found pleasure and meaning in science fiction. It beckoned me to imagine a world—indeed a universe—beyond the freeways, strip malls, and smog-alert days of my Southern California childhood."

Catherine S. Ramírez, Afrofuturism/ChicanafuturismAztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies 33:1, Spring 2008 (via shadowstookshape)

(via nothingman)

"Don’t romanticise your ‘vocation’. You can either write good sentences or you can’t. There is no ‘writer’s lifestyle’. All that matters is what you leave on the page."

Zadie Smith’s 10 rules of writing (via explore-blog)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

powhida:


Cynical Advice, 15” x 20”, Graphite, colored pencil, and watercolor on paper,2012.  For the 2012 BRIC benefit gala.  

powhida:

Cynical Advice, 15” x 20”, Graphite, colored pencil, and watercolor on paper,2012.  For the 2012 BRIC benefit gala.  

(via austinkleon)

"I only remember my own skin when I am touched. Find the edges of my body through your eyes or under your hands, against your skin. It feels like death every time you stop."

(via babypsykt)

(Source: lifeinpoetry, via utopiaorapocalypse)